Saving, investing and making money with technology

What To Know About Data Management Systems

Well you know a database management system (DBMS) is the software that allows a computer to store, retrieve, add, delete, and modify data. A DBMS manages all primary aspects of a database, including managing data manipulation, such as user authentication, as well as inserting or extracting data. A DBMS defines what’s called the data schema, or the structure in which the data is stored. And the tools we all use every day require DBMSs behind the scenes. This includes ATMs, flight reservation systems, retail inventory systems, and library catalogs, for instance.

Background on Database Management Systems

The term DBMS has been around since the 1960s, when IBM developed the first DBMS model called an Information Management System (IMS), in which data were stored in a computer in a hierarchical tree structure. Individual pieces of data were connected only between parent and child records. Profisee master data management is a company with a mission of innovating data management strategies by providing an easy to use, easy to deploy enterprise MDM platform.

The next generation of databases were network DBMS systems, which tried to solve some of the limitations of the hierarchical design by incorporating a one-to-many relationship between data. This took us into the 1970s when the relational database model was established by IBM’s Edgar F. Codd, literally the father of the modern relational DBMS that we know today.

Open communication

Open communication between management and employees sets the stage for an atmosphere of trust. But if you want to establish a new, more trusting culture, you can’t expect employees to take the first step. Company leadership initiates the process of open communication by sharing information with employees on a regular basis. This includes good news and bad. Southwest Airlines’ policy of sharing information enabled the company to weather the sudden increase in fuel costs during the 1990-91 Gulf War. The company kept everyone informed as fuel prices soared. Southwest’s CEO Herb Kelleher sent a memo to pilots asking for their help. Through inventive thinking, the pilots found ways to rapidly drop fuel consumption without compromising safety or service. Leaders of organizations that sustain innovation offer multiple opportunities for communication.

While not every company can offer an open-door policy for its senior executives, or even a chance for regular face-to-face contact, every organization can institute programs that enable front-line workers to feel heard. From CEO lunches with cross-sections of employees, to monthly division meetings between employees and the general manager, to open intranet forums for idea sharing and feedback, leaders can communicate their openness to hearing innovative ideas from those who are closest to the customer.

Innovation is also required to be competitive today and tomorrow

We all know now that businesses around the world are more connected than ever before. Just ask any company how many smartphones they have, how many tablets and laptops they have, how many virtual meetings are held with clients, and how many emails and text messages are sent. Oh, and we haven’t even talked about the use of social technologies. Being connected is probably the most powerful influencer of innovation. There are many reasons for this.

And also the immediacy and accuracy of real-time data transfer has become the norm. We now have the ability to share and connect with people, groups, and companies around the world. The quality and ease of use of digital media is not just for professionals any longer. Online learning and the global reach of it have changed the face of learning. Mobile technologies, cloud based storage, computing, medicine and space have continued to amaze us year after year. The list could go on. Some form of innovation touches every aspect of our life.

Managing that expectation and deliverable is critical for sustainable growth to occur. In thinking about sustainable growth, I spoke with Kevin Wells, Executive Vice President, Global Market Development for Reach Analytics. Kevin’s comments were quite telling when discussing how to predict innovation for growth purposes. How do you predict innovation, and also leverage predictive analytics so that your business can use that information to create growth?

Features of the Modern Relational DBMS

The relational database management systems (RDBMS) implement the relational model of tables and relationships. The primary design challenge of today’s relational DBMSs is to maintain data integrity, which protects the accuracy and consistency of the data. This is ensured through a series of constraints and rules on the data to avoid duplication or data loss.

DBMSs also control access to the database through authorization, which can be implemented at various levels. For example, managers or administrators might have access to data that is not visible to other employees, or they may have the authorization to edit the data while some users can only view it.

You know that most DBMSs use the structured query language SQL, which provides a way to interact with the database. In fact, even if the database provides a graphical interface that allows users to easily view, select, edit, or otherwise manipulate the data, it is SQL that performs these tasks in the background.

Examples of DBMSs

Today, many commercial and open-source DBMSs are available. In fact, choosing which database you need is a complex task. The high-end relational DBMS market is dominated by Oracle, Microsoft SQL Server, and IBM DB2, all credible choices for complex and large data systems. For small organizations or home use, popular DBMSs are Microsoft Access and FileMaker Pro.

More recently, other nonrelational DBMSs have grown in popularity. These are the NoSQL flavor, in which the rigidly defined schema of the RDBMs is replaced by a more flexible structure. These are useful for storing and working with very large data sets comprising a wide range of data types. Major players in this space include MongoDB, Cassandra, HBase, Redis, and CouchDB.

tracy collins

http://www.moneyandtechnology.com

I am a freelance writer blogger social media marketer and content marketer with twelve years of experience in writing and blogging.

View more posts from this author

 

PrimoLove  - 16oz

Loading…

 




Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

CommentLuv badge

%d bloggers like this: